Tag: Visual Studio

DevelopmentMobile

Troubleshooting the installation of Xamarin Android Device Manager

UPDATED: Feb 26 2018 (later that day)

This post is a follow up to how I got Xamarin Android Device Manager up and running on Windows. Please read the Xamarin Developer guide first which explains how to install and use the Xamarin Android Device Manager for Visual Studio on Windows (or for Mac). Please keep in mind that at the time of this post the Xamarin Android Device Manager is still in preview.

For me I’m running the latest version of Visual Studio 2017 (15.5.7) and I already had the Xamarin components installed and working. Up until now I wasn’t really using the Android emulators for any Xamarin development as I was more focused on iOS and Windows. However now I have a need to and so I decided to try out the new Xamarin Android Device manager. Why you might ask? Well as of Android SDK Tools version 26.0.1, Google has removed support for their UI-based AVD and SDK managers in favor of their new CLI (Command Line Interface) tools.

After having installed the latest version of the Xamarin Device Manager installer for Windows, I ran it from the Start menu with Administrator privileges like so:

sshot-360

And this is the error I get:

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I ran through the troubleshooting section section and the issue is that I was missing the Android SDK (requires 26 or higher). Perhaps a one of the latest Visual Studio updates caused this issue because now none of the Android tooling like device or emulator are working. Perhaps installing the Xamarin Device Manager broke it, I’m not sure but it’s broken. The only way I was able to resolve this was to run the Visual Studio Installer and uninstalled the the Xamarin SDK Manager and re-install it. Here is what I did.

My Solution to Fixing Missing Android SDK

1. Run Visual Studio Installer and then click on the Modify button:

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2. Now go to the Individual components tab and Remove Xamarin SDK Manager and then click on the Modify button to apply the changes. Take notice of the amount of disk space that will be freed up. For me it was 113 MB.

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3. Now do steps 1 and 2 again but this time add back the Xamarin SDK Manager and then notice the amount of disk space required for these changes…for me it was 1.4 GB, obviously something screwed up and I was missing a great deal. Now apply the changes by clicking on the Modify button.

Now when you run the Xamarin Android Device Manager from the start menu (with administrator rights) it should load up as expected. Now if you are like me and don’t have the latest Android SDK Tools, then you are then presented with the following dialog prompting you to download them from the Xamarin Android SDKs and Tools manager:

sshot-361

When the Xamarin Android SDK and Tools manager opens, review the SDK platforms you want installed and then click over to the Tools tab:

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In the Tools tab, expand the Android SDK Tools selection and change the selected tooling to the current version which is 26.1.1 and then click on the Apply Changes button. If you’re just changing the Android SDK Tools, this should only take a couple min at most to apply. Once it’s done close down the Android SDKs and Tools manager.

sshot-363

Now go back to Visual Studio (re-run if you have it running already) and run the Android Emulator Manager from the Tools – > Android menu.

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You will now be presented with the new Android Devices manager. When you first launch the Android Device Manager, it presents a screen that displays all currently configured virtual devices. For each device, the Name, Operating System (Android API Level), CPU, Memory size, and screen resolution are displayed:

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I then went on and added a new option for Android Oreo and when I tried to run it I got another error:

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Now it looks like I need to install another tool, Intel’s HAXM which requires Hyper-V be disabled.

Summary

What seemed like a quick and easy update has turned into quite the adventure. It’s 2018…why can’t this be more simple!

Enjoy!

References

Channel 9 | The Xamarin Show: Snack Pack | The New Xamarin Android Device Manager

How to setup and create Android virtual devices using Xamarin Android Device Manager

Installing Xamarin.Android on Windows

Installation Instructions for Intel® Hardware Accelerated Execution Manager (Intel® HAXM) – Microsoft Windows*

Development

GitHub for Visual Studio now allows Pull Request Comments from IDE

0917vsm_github_vs

GitHub for Visual Studio 2.3 was recently released and it brought new functionality that now allows you to add pull request comments directly from the IDE.

To get started you  will need the latest version of GitHub Extension for Visual Studio. Next open up a pull request from the GitHub pane and while viewing a file you can click on the left gutter (see blue plus button) to add your feedback, all without leaving Visual Studio.

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This functionality is still pretty limited but its a step in the right direction. I look forward to more GitHub online functionality making it’s way to this great extension.

Enjoy!

References

Inline comments in GitHub for Visual Studio

DevelopmentInfographics

Visual Studio 2017 Infographic – What’s New

Curious about what’s new in Visual Studio 2017? The Visual Studio team has released an infographic with all the new features. Take a look.

Enjoy!

VisualStudio2017_ProductLaunchPoster

Development

Visual Studio 2017 has Landed

Visual Studio 2017 is finally here and you can download now. Visual Studio 2017 enables you to be more productive for any application and on any platform.

If you download Visual Studio 2017 by March 14, you’ll get a 60-day access to Xamarin University which is a sweet deal.

What’s New

Visual Studio 2017 has a brand new installation experience which includes a minimal footprint for Visual Studio. Installation is quick (minutes not hours) and finally uninstalls cleanly. It’s also much easier to just install the features you want and need.

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Quick Reference of New Features

For a full list of all new features, please take a look at the release notes.

Enjoy!

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References

Visual Studio
Visual Studio 2017 Download
Visual Studio 2017 System Requirements
Visual Studio 2017 Release Notes

 

Development

Extended Strongly Typed Resource Generator for VS2013 and VS2015

Following up to a post I did in 2012 on ResXFileCodeGeneratorEx Update for VS2010, here are links to download this tool for Visual Studio 2015 and Visual Studio 2013:

Extension for Visual Studio 2015 can be found here:
https://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/f43d27fa-6bf7-4f3d-bf5e-3e716e63716b

Extension for Visual Studio 2013 can be found here:
https://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/16d24be3-6400-4a43-b946-766e41aca4bd

Enjoy!

CloudDevelopment

Elements for Visual Studio Online & TFS

Elements for Visual Studio Online & TFS.

Elements is a browser extension and does not require any server installation.It supports both Visual Studio Online and Team Foundation Server 2013.

elements-for-visual-studio-online-tfs

Reference

https://mohamedradwan.wordpress.com/2014/12/30/elements-for-visual-studio-online-tfs/

Development

Tips for Presenting Code in Visual Studio

Came across a great post for tips on presenting code in Visual Studio.

Summary of Tips

  1. Run Full Screen
  2. Configure Full Screen Mode
  3. Enable Presenter Mode
  4. Resize Further as Needed
  5. Zoom it
  6. Use the Light Theme

References

http://feedblitz.com/f/?fblike=http%3a%2f%2fwww.bitnative.com%2f2014%2f11%2f16%2fpresenting-code-in-visual-studio%2f

Productivity Power Tools

Increase DPI Scaling

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