Tag: Visual Studio 2017

Development

Updates to the New Project Dialog in Visual Studio 2017

With the release of Visual Studio 2017 Update 6 (version 15.6.x), you might have noticed that there was an update done to the New Project dialog to move the .NET Framework version selector down to the bottom below the solution name. This makes the New Project dialog cleaner and shows you which version of the .NET Framework will be used when creating your project.

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The Framework selector disappears when selecting non .NET Framework projects like ASP.NET Core, UWP, etc.

Enjoy!

Development

Visual Studio 2017 (15.6) has new Update Experience

After updating to Visual Studio 2017 (15.6) earlier today I noticed a minor update is out (15.6.1) and you will notice a new update experience as shown here. The updated dialog shows the current version, the update version and a link for the release notes:

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This update (15.6.1) only takes a couple minutes to apply.

Enjoy!

AzureInfographicsMobile

Resources for Mobile apps using Xamarin + Azure

Earlier this week the Mobile apps using Xamarin + Azure poster was released. It serves as your essential guide to the most relevant cloud services provided by Azure for you as a mobile developer using Xamarin with Visual Studio and Azure.

You can download your poster here.

Enjoy!

References

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/visualstudio/2018/02/21/your-guide-to-azure-services-for-apps-built-with-xamarin/?utm_source=vs_developer_news&utm_medium=referral

DevelopmentMobile

Troubleshooting the installation of Xamarin Android Device Manager

UPDATED: Feb 26 2018 (later that day)

This post is a follow up to how I got Xamarin Android Device Manager up and running on Windows. Please read the Xamarin Developer guide first which explains how to install and use the Xamarin Android Device Manager for Visual Studio on Windows (or for Mac). Please keep in mind that at the time of this post the Xamarin Android Device Manager is still in preview.

For me I’m running the latest version of Visual Studio 2017 (15.5.7) and I already had the Xamarin components installed and working. Up until now I wasn’t really using the Android emulators for any Xamarin development as I was more focused on iOS and Windows. However now I have a need to and so I decided to try out the new Xamarin Android Device manager. Why you might ask? Well as of Android SDK Tools version 26.0.1, Google has removed support for their UI-based AVD and SDK managers in favor of their new CLI (Command Line Interface) tools.

After having installed the latest version of the Xamarin Device Manager installer for Windows, I ran it from the Start menu with Administrator privileges like so:

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And this is the error I get:

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I ran through the troubleshooting section section and the issue is that I was missing the Android SDK (requires 26 or higher). Perhaps a one of the latest Visual Studio updates caused this issue because now none of the Android tooling like device or emulator are working. Perhaps installing the Xamarin Device Manager broke it, I’m not sure but it’s broken. The only way I was able to resolve this was to run the Visual Studio Installer and uninstalled the the Xamarin SDK Manager and re-install it. Here is what I did.

My Solution to Fixing Missing Android SDK

1. Run Visual Studio Installer and then click on the Modify button:

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2. Now go to the Individual components tab and Remove Xamarin SDK Manager and then click on the Modify button to apply the changes. Take notice of the amount of disk space that will be freed up. For me it was 113 MB.

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3. Now do steps 1 and 2 again but this time add back the Xamarin SDK Manager and then notice the amount of disk space required for these changes…for me it was 1.4 GB, obviously something screwed up and I was missing a great deal. Now apply the changes by clicking on the Modify button.

Now when you run the Xamarin Android Device Manager from the start menu (with administrator rights) it should load up as expected. Now if you are like me and don’t have the latest Android SDK Tools, then you are then presented with the following dialog prompting you to download them from the Xamarin Android SDKs and Tools manager:

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When the Xamarin Android SDK and Tools manager opens, review the SDK platforms you want installed and then click over to the Tools tab:

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In the Tools tab, expand the Android SDK Tools selection and change the selected tooling to the current version which is 26.1.1 and then click on the Apply Changes button. If you’re just changing the Android SDK Tools, this should only take a couple min at most to apply. Once it’s done close down the Android SDKs and Tools manager.

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Now go back to Visual Studio (re-run if you have it running already) and run the Android Emulator Manager from the Tools – > Android menu.

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You will now be presented with the new Android Devices manager. When you first launch the Android Device Manager, it presents a screen that displays all currently configured virtual devices. For each device, the Name, Operating System (Android API Level), CPU, Memory size, and screen resolution are displayed:

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I then went on and added a new option for Android Oreo and when I tried to run it I got another error:

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Now it looks like I need to install another tool, Intel’s HAXM which requires Hyper-V be disabled.

Summary

What seemed like a quick and easy update has turned into quite the adventure. It’s 2018…why can’t this be more simple!

Enjoy!

References

Channel 9 | The Xamarin Show: Snack Pack | The New Xamarin Android Device Manager

How to setup and create Android virtual devices using Xamarin Android Device Manager

Installing Xamarin.Android on Windows

Installation Instructions for Intel® Hardware Accelerated Execution Manager (Intel® HAXM) – Microsoft Windows*

Uncategorized

How to Configure Git in Visual Studio to Prune Branches during a Fetch

If you’ve been using Git from within Visual Studio 2017 you might be aware of the fact that when performing a fetch it would not automatically prune your local list of branches that no longer exist on the server. Typically you would have to open up a Command Prompt and run the following command to cleanup your list of branches that exist on the remote:

> git remote prune origin

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Well now with Visual Studio 2017 Update 5 you can now configure your global and repository settings to prune your local list of branches on every fetch. Let’s take a look at how you can configure this.

First download and install Visual Studio 2017 Update 5. You can do this from within Visual Studio under the Tools menu:

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Once you have Visual Studio 2017 Update 5 installed, go to the Team Explorer pane and click on Settings where you can configure your default behavior for your Global and/or Repository Settings:

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Now you can change the setting to prune remote branches on every fetch. In my opinion this should be the default value.

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Another nice addition to the Git settings in Visual Studio 2017 Update 5 is the ability to Rebase your changes when you pull. I’ll explore that in a future post.

In summary when enabling the prune on every fetch, this means your local list of branches is always up-to-date with the remote. Pruning will cleanup and remove your local tracking branches that no longer exist on the server.

Enjoy!

References

Git Configuration: Configure your default behavior

DevelopmentInfographics

Visual Studio 2017 Infographic – What’s New

Curious about what’s new in Visual Studio 2017? The Visual Studio team has released an infographic with all the new features. Take a look.

Enjoy!

VisualStudio2017_ProductLaunchPoster

Development

Visual Studio 2017 has Landed

Visual Studio 2017 is finally here and you can download now. Visual Studio 2017 enables you to be more productive for any application and on any platform.

If you download Visual Studio 2017 by March 14, you’ll get a 60-day access to Xamarin University which is a sweet deal.

What’s New

Visual Studio 2017 has a brand new installation experience which includes a minimal footprint for Visual Studio. Installation is quick (minutes not hours) and finally uninstalls cleanly. It’s also much easier to just install the features you want and need.

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Quick Reference of New Features

For a full list of all new features, please take a look at the release notes.

Enjoy!

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References

Visual Studio
Visual Studio 2017 Download
Visual Studio 2017 System Requirements
Visual Studio 2017 Release Notes