Category: Windows

DevelopmentWindows

.NET Core 3 for Windows Desktop | .NET Blog

.NET Core 3 for Windows Desktop | .NET Blog
— Read on devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/net-core-3-for-windows-desktop/

DeveloperWindows

Adding the Visual Studio Developer Command Prompt to Windows Terminal

The Windows Terminal was announced at Build 2019 and is open source and free. In this article I’ll show you how to add a new shell profile for the Developer Command Prompt for VS2019.

Getting Windows Terminal

Windows Terminal requires Windows 10 1903. You can get the Windows Terminal for free from the Store. For users who are unable to download from the Store, Windows Terminal builds can manually be downloaded from the repositories Release page.

JSON Syntax

The Windows Terminal settings is stored in a “Profiles.json” file. You can access this file from the Settings menu located in the dropdown menu to the right of the add new shell button as shown below.

Alternatively this file is located in the following path:

%USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\LocalState

Editing the Profiles.json file is easy, but if your unfamiliar with the JSON syntax then there are few things you need to know.

  1. Do not use backslash (\) in file paths. These should be replaced with a forward slash (/).
  2. Always close files paths in double quotes.
  3. All lines must end in a comma except for the last line in a section or block.

Adding the Develper Command Prompt Profile

This section assumes that you have Visual Studio 2019 installed and have access to the Developer Command Prompt for VS 2019.

{
    "acrylicOpacity": 0.75,
    "closeOnExit": true,
    "colorScheme": "Campbell",
    "commandline": "cmd.exe /k \"C://Program Files (x86)//Microsoft Visual Studio//2019//Enterprise//Common7//Tools//VsDevCmd.bat\"",
    "cursorColor": "#FFFFFF",
    "cursorShape": "bar",
    "fontFace": "Consolas",
    "fontSize": 10,
    "guid": "{26b30263-74e9-4146-b80e-11632e86d42c}",
    "historySize": 9001,
    "icon": "ms-appdata:///roaming/vs2019-32.png",
    "name": "Developer Command Prompt for VS2019",
    "padding": "0, 0, 0, 0",
    "snapOnInput": true,
    "startingDirectory": "%USERPROFILE%",
    "useAcrylic": true
},

A couple things to note about the above profile that you might need to change based on your local system.

  1. For the “commandline” line, you will want to change “Enterprise” to the Visual Studio 2019 SKU you have, like “Professional” or “Community”.
  2. For the “icon” line, I downloaded a VS 2019 icon from https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/ and resized it to 32×32 and saved it in my RoamingState folder %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\RoamingState
  3. For the “guid” line, you need to generate a new GUID and enter it in here.

Once you’ve saved these changes restart the Windows Terminal app and your new Developer Command Prompt for VS 2019 will be listed.

There are a number of other consoles you can add like “Python”, “Linux Bash”, “PowerShell Core, “Ubuntu”, and many more.

Enjoy!

References

Windows Terminal on GitHub

Download Windows Terminal from the Store

Windows Terminal Documentation

A new Console for Windows – It’s the open source Windows Terminal

Build 2019DeveloperWindows

Build 2019: Announcing the new Windows Terminal

During Rajesh Jha’s keynote, Kevin Gallo announced the new Windows Terminal and showed the following “sizzle video” that showcases that the team wants to aspire for v1.0: 

Windows Terminal Session

Rich Turner (Senior Program Manager) and Michael Niksa (Senior Software Engineer) delivered a deep-dive session into the Windows Terminal, its architecture, and its code.

What’s new with the Windows Command Line

See Scott Hanselman interview the Windows Terminal team and discuss several aspects of the new Terminal capabilities, the process of opening sourcing Terminal and looking at some of its features:

The new Windows Terminal will run alongside Console and will not replace it. They are looking to target a preview download from the Microsoft Store by Summer 2019, and to deliver v1.0 release by end of 2019.

You can go try it now if you like by cloning the repository. This is pretty exciting and I can’t wait to download, compile and give it a try.

Enjoy!

References

Windows

Windows 10 Mail and Calendar app finally gets complete dark mode

image

Today Microsoft is rolling out an update to its Mail and Calendar app and has finally added a complete dark mode to which the reading pane is now dark (previously the reading pane or email body was white). Microsoft has also added a toggle button to switch between light and dark which sits between the Forward and Archive buttons.

The new update is available for everyone that is using Windows 10 1809 build. You can download the Mail and Calendar app from the Microsoft Store.

Enjoy!

Windows

How to Find your Windows 10 Spotlight Lock Screen Images

Have you ever wondered where you can find the Windows 10 Spotlight Lock Screen images? Well the following post explains How to Find Windows Spotlight Lock Screen Images in Windows 10 and the extract them for using as your Windows 10 desktop background.

Enjoy!

References

https://www.tekrevue.com/tip/find-windows-spotlight-lock-screen-images-windows-10/

Windows

How to enable PIN and Fingerprint sign-in options in Windows 10 Anniversary Edition (build 1607) when on a Domain

Windows 10 has some very handy sign-in options for unlocking your computer including using a fingerprint, a picture or a numeric PIN. I’ve used all three and by far my favorite is the PIN option.

Recently I reformatted my Surface Pro 3 and after installing Windows 10 Anniversary edition (build 1607), I noticed that as soon as I joined my work domain, the PIN option for sign-in was disabled. This was strange since hours earlier I was using this sign-in option with Windows 10 Anniversary edition prior to reformatting my device. I decided to try signing in to my device using a local profile and the PIN sign-on option was now available, but strangely on my Windows Domain account it was not.

After doing some research online I found that with Windows 10 Anniversary edition, this feature has reverted back to how it functioned in Windows 8, which requires it to be authorized before you can use it when on a Windows Domain.

Here is what you need to do to enable it.

Steps to Enable PIN Sign-In Option for Windows 10

  1. Open up regedit.exe
  2. Browse to [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System]
  3. Add a new DWORD key named “AllowDomainPINLogon” and set its value to “1”
    sshot-3
  4. Restart your computer
  5. After logging back in to your computer, go to SETTINGS, ACCOUNTS, SIGN-IN OPTIONS and you should see that the PIN option is now available to be set
    image

Enjoy!

References

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/84a0bd50-1360-4a94-bfb3-b049ecace521/pin-and-fingerprint-signin-options-unavailable-greyed-out-in-windows-10-1607-enterprise?forum=win10itprogeneral&prof=required

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/b975932a-b50b-4759-b43a-c94854c6da83/cant-enable-windows-hello-with-fresh-install-of-anniversity-upgrade-on-domain-account?forum=win10itprosetup

DevelopmentIoTTechnologyWindows

Unboxing Adafruit Starter Pack for Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry Pi 2

AdafruitDisplay

Today I received my Starter Pack for Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry Pi 2. I purchased it from Adafruit, which you can order from here.

“Windows 10 IoT Core is a new edition of Windows targeted towards small embedded devices and maker boards such as Raspberry Pi2. IoT core is designed to work with low-level bus interfaces such as I2C, SPI, USB. You can write a Universal Windows Application using a variety of programming languages in Visual Studio to rapidly create maker projects.

You can use Windows 10 IoT Core to read sensor data, control actuators, connect to the cloud, create IoT applications and much more. The Starter Pack from Adafruit includes parts to get you started.”

Let’s get started!

Unboxing

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The Parts

Essentials

Item Quantity
Raspberry Pi 2 Board (Included in some versions of the Adafruit Starter Kit) 1
Adafruit Raspberry Pi Case 1
8GB SD card with Windows IoT Core 1
5V 2A Power Supply with MicroUSB Cable 1
USB WiFi Module 1
Ethernet Cable 1
Full Size Breadboard 1

Components

Item Quantity
Premium Male/Male Jumper Wires 1
Premium Female/Male Jumper Wires 1
MCP3008 – 8-Channel 10-Bit ADC 1
Assorted LEDs 6
Potentiometers 2
Tactile Switches 3
Resistors 10
Capacitor 1

Sensors

Item Quantity
Photocell 1
Adafruit BMP280 Temperature + Barometric Sensor 1
Adafruit TCS34725 Color Sensor 1

 

Setup

Plug in the HDMI and Ethernet cables and then plug in the power source. It was too late at night to setup the wifi, so I’ll leave that for another day.

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It took about 5 minutes for the Raspberry Pi to boot up the first time.

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Once it was booted up you see the following screen which allows you to interact with the device.

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Next Steps

Now that you’ve connected your Raspberry Pi, you need to configure your PC and Raspberry Pi before your can start development.

  1. Setting up your PC
  2. Setting up your Raspberry Pi
  3. Start Coding!

Enjoy!