Tag: Serverless

AzureDeveloperDevelopment

25 days of serverless

Azure Advocates’ 25 Days of Serverless

December 1st sparks the start of Microsoft’s 25 days of serverless challanges. Each day throughout the month of December a new challenge will be published from the Microsoft Cloud Advocates. Your goal is to solve it in the programming language of your choice and then submit your solution via GitHub.

If you don’t know anything about Azure or serverless then no problem. Each challenge will provide hints to get your started

The Premise

Oh no! An evil grinch has stolen all of the world’s servers! Travel around the world helping everyone replace their current solutions to common tasks with serverless technology in time for the holiday rush.

Each day’s puzzle will bring you to a new location somewhere in the world! You’ll be helping local folks in that location with some problem they have, showing how moving to serverless can help things get done! Each day’s puzzle will bring you to a new location somewhere in the world! You’ll be helping local folks in that location with some problem they have, showing how moving to serverless can help things get done!

Join the Microsoft @AzureAdvocates and puzzle solvers all over the world for #25DaysOfServerless adventures!

Enjoy!

References

https://25daysofserverless.com/

https://dev.to/azure/merry-and-bright-with-azure-advocates-25-days-of-serverless-1hi0

AzureCloud

Comparing Serverless Architecture Providers: AWS, Azure, Google, IBM, and Other FaaS Vendors – DZone Cloud

This article takes a look at the four largest cloud vendors and compares them based on services, prices, languages and more, and offers some alternatives.
— Read on dzone.com/articles/comparing-serverless-architecture-providers-aws-az

AzureEventsMVP

Ignite The Tour 2019 Toronto Recap

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This year I had the opportunity to attend and participate as a speaker at the Microsoft Ignite The Tour in Toronto. The event was held over two days from January 10-11, 2019 at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, and provided a venue for developers and tech professionals to continue learning alongside experts in developer tools and cloud technologies. It also provided an opportunity to connect with technical community and learn best practices and insights into cloud development, data, IT, AI, and business intelligence.

With events like this I usually attend as an attendee, but this year myself and two colleagues put through submissions for the call for speakers from the MVP community. For me this year has largely been about Azure DevOps and trying to connect with local developers, IT, and businesses and showing them up to take advantage of DevOps, specially with Azure DevOps. So it was only natural to focus my efforts around this. It also provided a great opportunity to connect with industry experts and other Microsoft MVP’s to further my education and career path.

Here are some morning pictures outside the contention centre. It was a nice clear day, but it was very cold.

IMG_20190110_082201 IMG_20190110_082207

Getting Prepared for my Talk

Day 1 of the conference was our talk on Azure DevOps. After getting my badge I met up with my co-presenters Ehsan and Arlan in the speaker room. This is a relatively quiet place to get away from the crowd and do some preparation or just relax. The food here was great too!

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Presenting – Azure DevOps Community Meetup

Our talk was a community meetup on Azure DevOps with 146 people registered and we had great turnout of 130 or so. The presentation sparked many conversations with the attendees and other community MVPs. This later led to a conversation about coordinating a single Global Azure DevOps Bootcamp in the Great Toronto Area which was very exciting.

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Working the Microsoft Area – Demo Stations, Lounges and Meeting Pods

After the presentation was done we had arranged a Meeting Pod for both days to continue the Q&A discussions that sparked from the talk. This allowed attendees to come and talk with us afterwards since our time in the room was limited. I also got to work the Demo Station where anyone could walk up to me any ask me anything. I focused my demos on Azure DevOps, Azure Functions, Event Grid and Logic Apps.

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Networking, Socializing and Connecting with the Community

Of course you need to have fun and there was plenty of it throughout the two days. I had the opportunity to connect with other MVP’s in the local community and those that flew in for the event. I love this group and the passion we all share to learn and help others in the community.

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In the evening there was a MVP social dinner. The name tags for the event were a neat idea, 1.44” floppy disks on a lanyard. I wonder what rock those disks were dug up from? I’m sure I have a box of these somewhere in my basement “tech” museum.

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Wrap Up

Having the opportunity to participate at a conference like this was amazing. What was special about this event is that it was my first high profile conference to speak at. When I was younger public speaking was something I dreaded and tried to avoid at all cost. Speaking at conferences like this is nerve racking at first but does goes away as you get comfortable and relaxed. You get so much support from the tech community, whether its other speakers, colleagues or just the attendees wanting to engage with you and try to solve similar problems.

I had a blast at this event and I can’t wait for next year. I hope I once again get the opportunity to participate in this conference as a speaker, staffer or both.

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Enjoy!

Resources

Azure

Azure Service Fabric Mesh is now in Public Preview

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Earlier today, Service Fabric Mesh was made available to everyone as a public preview. At Build 2018, Microsoft announced and demonstrated Service Fabric Mesh, a serverless offering of Azure Service Fabric. The public preview is available in three Azure regions: US West, US East, and Europe West and the availability will expand to other regions in the coming months.

Azure Service Fabric Mesh, a fully-managed service that enables developers to deploy and operate containerized applications without having to manage VMs, storage or networking configuration, while keeping the enterprise-grade reliability, scalability, and mission-critical performance of Service Fabric. Service Fabric Mesh supports both Windows and Linux containers, so you can develop with the programming language and framework of your choice.

You can get started today by heading over to the Azure Service Fabric Mesh documentation.

Be sure to take a look at the Azure Service Fabric Mesh Public Preview Announcement for frequently asked questions (FAQ) on what’s supported, and limitations. Since this is only a public preview, there is no SLA for production use.

Enjoy!

Resources

Azure Service Fabric Mesh Public Preview Announcement

Azure Service Fabric Mesh tools now available for Visual Studio 2017

Azure Friday – Azure Service Fabric Mesh Preview

Azure Service Fabric Mesh documentation

Azure Service Fabric Mesh samples

Azure Service Fabric Mesh pricing

Azure Service Fabric Mesh Container Quick Start

Azure

Comparing Azure Functions Runtime Versions

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Azure Functions now have 2 different runtimes, version 1 which is what is currently in production and the only runtime supported for production use, and version 2 which is currently in preview. I’ll cover the difference in both runtimes and when to use which version.

Overview or Version 1

The version 1 runtime is what is currently used in production and is the only version supported for production use. This runtime is based on .NET Framework 4.6 and only support Windows for development and/or hosting in the portal. Version 1 also only supports the following languages: C#, JavaScript, and F#.

What’s New in Version 2

Version 2 runtime has been rebuilt from the ground up on .NET Core 2.0 and support cross platform (Windows and Linux) for deployment and for development you can use Windows, Linux, and macOS.

Version 2 introduces language extension model that both JavaScript and Java are taking advantage of. There is also expanded language support for Java and more coming. We also have new bindings for Microsoft Graph and Durable Functions.

Azure Functions is a great serverless offering and provides lots of functionality for almost any application. If you need to run code in production than version 1 is your only choice, but if you want to try out Azure Functions then definitely take a look at both runtimes. With Microsoft annual developer conference Build next month, I bet we will hear more information about version 2 runtime and a timeline for release.

Enjoy!

References

Azure Functions runtime versions overview

Install Azure Functions Core Tools

Azure Functions Roadmap

Azure

Introduction to Durable Functions

Durable Functions is a new extension of Azure Functions which manages state, checkpoints and restarts for you. Durable Functions provide the capability to code stateful functions in a serverless environment. This new extension enables a new type of function called an orchestrator. The primary use case for Durable Functions is to simplify complex, stateful coordination problems in serverless applications. Some advantages of an orchestrator function are:

  • Workflows are defined in code. This means no JSON schemas or designers are needed.
  • Other functions can be called synchronously or asynchronously. Output from functions can be saved to local variables.
  • Automatic checkpoint the progress of the function whenever it awaits. This means local state is never lost if the process recycles or the VM reboots.

The following are 5 sample patterns where Durable Functions can help.

Pattern #1: Function Chaining

Function chaining is the execution of functions in sequence where the output of one function is the input to another function. With this pattern you typically use queues to pass state from function to function.

Function chaining diagram

Pattern #2: Fan-out/Fan-in

Fan-out/Fan-in refers to the execution of multiple functions in parallel and then waiting for all of them to finish. This pattern also uses queues to manage state from start to end. Fanning back in is much more complicated as you would have to track the outputs of all the functions waiting for them to finish.

Fan-out/fan-in diagram 

Pattern #3: Async HTTP APIs

Async HTTP APIs pattern is all about the problem of coordinating the state of long running operations with external APIs. With this pattern you often use another status endpoint for the client to check on the status of the long running operation.

HTTP API diagram

Pattern #4: Monitoring

The Monitoring pattern is a recurring process in a workflow where the function polls for a certain condition to be met. A simple timer trigger could address this but its interval is static and management of it is more complex.

Monitor diagram

Pattern #5: Human Interaction

Finally we have the Human Interaction pattern. This pattern is where a function executes but its process is gated based on some sort of human interaction. People are not always available or respond in a timely manner which introduces complexity to your function process.

Human interaction diagram

In all five use cases, Durable Functions provides built-in support for easily handling these scenarios without the need extra resources likes queues, timers, etc for managing state and controlling the function flow. For more information on each of these patterns and code samples please see the Durable Functions documentation.

Durable Functions is currently in preview and is an advanced extension for Azure Functions that is not appropriate for all scenarios. Next month is the annual Microsoft developer conference Build. I suspect we’ll see some new exciting details with Azure Functions and Durable Functions specifically. Hopefully they become generally available.

Enjoy!

References

Overview of Azure Functions

Durable Functions Documentation

AzureEvents

Azure Developer Tour is Coming!

azure developer tour

The latest in compute, serverless and more – hosted by the Azure Advocates.

This is a a FREE event where you’ll learn about compute, serverless, storage, big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning and so much more…plus lunch is included (every developer loves a free lunch).

Cities

Toronto, On – April 3, 2018

Vancouver, BC – April 5, 2018

Washington, D.C. – April 6, 2018

Los Angeles, CA – April 9, 2018

Austin, TX – April 10, 2018

San Francisco, CA – April 12, 2018

Seattle, WA – April 12, 2018

In addition there will be University Tours for students and faculty.

Register at a city near you to learn how to build great cloud apps!

Enjoy!

References

https://www.microsoftevents.com/profile/web/index.cfm?PKwebID=0x752173abcd&wt.mc_id=AID688794_owned_CESocial_Copy