Tag: Azure

Azure

#AzureApril–Day 1

Inspired by @burkeholland, @editingemily, @sigje and others where instead of putting effort into an Aprils Fools joke, I will instead take the #AzureApril challenge of posting an Azure tip each day in April. Some tips might come from @mbcrump comprehensive list of tips and tricks, while others might come from me and/or the community. Now on to todays tip.

Tip #1

Azure has over a 100 services that offer you everything you need to develop, build and run you applications with all the performance, redundancy, security, and scale that the cloud has to offer. With all these services sometimes it can be daunting on where to begin.

Todays tip is to take bite-sized lessons to reinforce your #Azure skills, all in a single month of lunches. This is a practical guide to learning Azure cloud computing skills quickly or refresh what you already know.

By reading this e-book, you get to build your cloud computing skills quickly and efficiently. You’ll be productive immediately, and when you finish, you’ll be well on your way to Azure mastery.

For more details and to download the e-book, go to https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/resources/learn-azure-in-a-month-of-lunches/

Since we’re starting a new month today this is a great tip to tackle and complete by end of the month, all while eating your lunch.

Enjoy!

References

Learn Azure in a Month of Lunches

Azure

New Azure Datacenters Open in Africa

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Today Microsoft announced the general availability of new Azure regions in Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa. This marks a major milestone as Microsoft is the first global cloud provider to deliver cloud services from datacenters on the African continent.

Microsoft Azure now has a total of 54 regions worldwide that span 140 countries. That’s more than all other cloud providers combined – offering the scale needed to bring applications closer to your users around the world, preserving data residency, and offering comprehensive compliance and resiliency options.

Enjoy!

References

Microsoft opens first datacenters in Africa with general availability of Microsoft Azure

Azure Regions

Azure Locations

CommunityEvents

UofTHacks VI Recap

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This past weekend I got the opportunity and had the pleasure of participating in my first hackathon at the UofTHacks VI, which was at the University of Toronto campus from January 18th to the 20th at the Bahen Centre for Information Technology. The event consisted of over 500 hackers, and spanned 36 hours, and would ultimately prize 3 winners.

hack•a•thon

An event, typically lasting several days, in which a large number of people meet to engage in collaborative computer programming. We look past this traditional definition of a hackathon and take it to new heights. UofTHacks is the University of Toronto’s annual hackathon. At UofTHacks, we bring people together to make new friends, learn new things, and bring new ideas to life.

I was participating as a Microsoft sponsor. This meant I was available to help mentor the students who had questions on Microsoft Azure or anything for that matter, and provide them with an insider perspective of how things work in the industry. I also then got to be a judge for the Microsoft prize which was based on projects that leverage Microsoft Azure services.

It was a lot of fun to work with these students as they had such drive and passion for what they worked on. The judging aspect was probably the best part as I got to take a look at over a dozen projects and see what they built, why they built it, how they built and then where would they take it next. Almost all the projects had real world applications and some even created business plans as part of their sales pitch.

Some of the big sponsors at the event were Microsoft, Google, IBM, Interact, Intel, Standard Library, ChainSafe, Lyft and SmartCar, plus many others.

As for the Microsoft prize, it was 4 Xbox One X 1TB consoles. This was presented to team Blink who created an application that would sit in your car and monitor the drivers eyes for signs of fatigue, drowsiness, or any other impairment. They leveraged the Microsoft Custom Vision Service and built their own data model that consisted over 250 images they gathered from the event of peoples eyes. They eyes were that of different ages, different skin colors, with and without glasses. They also retrained this model a number of times over the course of the 36 hour event, including the morning of judging session when the room had different lighting conditions. Their was a mobile and server components of the app that would send out SMS alerts to the registered emergency contact in the event impairment was detected and also alert emergency services. It was a well put together hack that had a clear application for issues we encounter today.

Here are some pictures of the event

IMG_20190120_082107IMG_20190120_075244IMG_20190120_075251IMG_20190120_082203IMG_20190120_083846IMG_20190120_102713IMG_20190120_082200IMG_20190120_104332IMG_20190120_133621IMG_20190120_140242IMG_20190120_151045

This might of been my first hackathon but it definitely won’t be my last. I will keep an eye out for something more suited for the working developer that is maybe limited to a day, otherwise I hope to come back next year and help these students out and see what they create.

Enjoy!

Resources

https://uofthacks.com/

Team Blink – A machine learning eye detection app which determines if the driver of a smartcar is impaired & alerts 1st responders

Azure

Moving your Azure Resources to Another Subscription or Resource Group

At some point or another you may  need to move your Azure resources to either another Azure Resource Group or to another Azure Subscription. This is easy to do and is useful when organizing your resources for management or billing scenarios. Before moving any resources it’s best to take a look at the following checklist before moving resources link.

Ok let’s get started. In this example I’ll be moving an Azure Resource Group with a number of services over to another Azure Subscription.

Steps to move resources

Step 1 – Navigate to the resource group you want to move. Go to the Resource groups blade in the Azure portal and then navigate to the particular resource group.

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Step 2 – Click on Move button and then select Move to another subscription option.

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Step 3 – Next in the resources to move screen, review the resources that are to be moved over which are all automatically selected. Then select the subscription and resource group you want to move target. If the resource group is not already created, you can create it now by clicking on the link to create a new resource group.

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Step 4 – Now click on the OK button to start the process. The job will then be validated and then you will see a notification of the movement in progress, followed by a success or failure notification. In the event of a failure, details will be provided on why the resources could not be moved. Usually after working through these issues you can try again.

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Step 5 – You should now go to the new resource group you created and verify all the resources are accounted for and that the resources still function as intended.

Step 6 – Finally you want to tidy up and delete the original resource group on the source subscription as it’s now empty and should not be used again. To do this go to the original resource group and click on Delete resource group button. You will be prompted to type in the name of the resource group to confirm you want to continue.

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Summary

This article covered moving a resource group and all of its resources from one subscription to another. The same process is applicable when moving resources from one resource group to another within the same subscription.

Enjoy!

References

Move resources to new resource group or subscription

Azure

Azure Overview Tool

Have you ever wanted to find out if a particular Azure service is in preview or generally available? Fellow Azure MVP Barry Luijbregts created a great website which provides up-to-date status of Azure services.

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Azure is constantly changing and is sometimes overwhelming to try and keep up with what’s in preview vs generally available. What is awesome about this website is that it’s more up to date than the other Microsoft sites that try to provide this information.

The website is also open source, and you can check out the source code on GitHub: https://github.com/bmaluijb/AzureOverview.

I’ve definitely added this site to my bookmarks and look forward to further enhancements. Thanks Barry!

Enjoy!

References

https://www.azureoverview.com/

https://www.azurebarry.com/find-the-status-of-azure-services-on-azureoverview-com/

AzureDevOps

Introducing the Azure DevOps Service Status Portal

Last week Microsoft introduced the Azure DevOps Service status portal which provides real-time insights into the current health of Azure DevOps regional feature status and provides additional details on specific events either current or historical.

When you go to the Azure DevOps Service status portal, the main dashboard shows you a 2-dimensional matrix mapping of the feature with geographic regions as shown below.

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To see current or historical events, click on the Status History link where you can filter the results by service type, categories, severity and then date range:

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Clicking on a particular event log will take you to the event log page which shows all details about the event, what was affected, when it was resolved, and then any workarounds that users can take if needed.

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REST APIs will be coming soon for users looking to build automated solutions to watch the service status.

For service health updates relating to Azure’s global services, please refer to the Azure Status page.

For more information on the new Azure DevOps Service status portal, please refer to the Azure DevOps Service Status documentation.

Enjoy!

References

Azure DevOps Service Status portal

Azure DevOps Service Status documentation

AzureDevOps

Azure DevOps rolls out a dark theme preview

This week Azure DevOps finally rolled out one of their most requested feature, a dark theme. I use dark theme for just about any app that supports it, so this is a welcome addition to Azure DevOps. Keep in mind that this is just a preview and is still being refined.

To switch to Dark theme, go to your Azure DevOps portal and click on your user dropdown menu in the top right corner. Then click on Theme menu item.

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The theme options pane will then be displayed. Click on the Dark (preview) option to switch to the dark theme.

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Voila! DevOps in Dark theme.

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Switching to dark theme is a personal choice and is not something that is forced across your organization, which is nice. I recommend you give it a try and see for yourself.

Enjoy!

References

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/devops/

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/devops/2018/11/01/whats-new-in-azure-devops-sprint-142-update/