All posts by Callon Campbell

AnalyticsAzure

Monitoring and Scaling your Azure Functions

Everybody loves Azure Functions. My team recently deployed a production service using Azure Functions as the back end backbone. I’d like to share some lessons and tips we learned along the way. We’re using Azure functions in consumption plan – which basically means the platform scales in and out as required without our intervention. But […]

via Monitoring and Scaling Azure Functions — 4pp1n51ght5

Azure

How to cleanup your Azure Functions URL and remove /api from the route

We looked at Azure Functions. We also looked at security around Azure Function used to implement APIs. Something people will quickly notice when implementing an Webhook / API function is that its URL or route is always prepended by /api. For instance, if we create a webhook function in C# and we setup the route […]

via How to get rid of /api in Azure Function’s route? — Vincent-Philippe Lauzon’s

EventsMVP

Microsoft MVP Summit Checklist — Ken Cenerelli

In March 2018, I will be heading to my third Microsoft MVP Global Summit. Just like in past years, MVPs from around the world converge on Bellevue, Redmond, and Seattle, Washington for several days of technical sessions and camaraderie on the Microsoft campus. While the majority of MVPs attending are returnees, a good portion is […]

via Microsoft MVP Summit Checklist — Ken Cenerelli

DatabaseProductivity

How to Enable Dark Theme for SQL Server Management Studio

Updated Feb. 21, 2018 – Each time you install a newer version of SSMS, like 17.5 that released last week, you will need to go and update the configuration file and comment out the Dark theme references as described below.

If you’re like me and you like to use the Visual Studio Dark theme and wish you could use this theme for SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS), unfortunately, there is no official support at this time (keep bugging Microsoft for this feature please). Currently SSMS 2016 and SSMS 17 support both the Blue and Light themes.

If you weren’t aware, SQL Server Management Studio is built on the Visual Studio shell, so it does support the Dark theme but it’s currently disabled due to “unfinished work” with various parts of the application like the Object Explorer and Output panes.

Here is my current SSMS 17 using the Light theme:

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To enable the Dark theme follow these simple steps

1. Close down all running instances of SSMS

2. Open Windows Explorer and browse to the following location to change the configuration file ssms.pkgundef

    • For SSMS 2016: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio
    • For SSMS 17: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\140\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio

3. Type the name of the file into the search box at the top right corner and then right click to edit this file. Note: You will need to edit this file with Administrative rights.

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4. Now search the file for the following line // Remove Dark Theme and then comment out each line in this section by using // at the start of each line in this section as shown below:

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5. Save the file and now re-launch SSMS. After restarting SSMS, go to Options you will see the Dark them listed. Select the Dark theme and then press the OK button.

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Your SSMS should now be using the Dark theme, similar to what my SSMS looks like now after enabling this theme. Ah this is much better!

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For the most part its dark but where it fails is in the Object Explorer and Output panes as you can see here:

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There is a way to go into Options and tweak the colors for the Output pane (results grid and messages), but that is extremely tedious and not worth the effort in my opinion.

Alternate Solutions

Now I’m not sure why this is not fully supported yet, especially for the Object Explorer and the Output panes. People keep asking for this feature and release after release it’s still not properly supported.

Now if you look at Visual Studio, there is a SQL Server Object Explorer and when you run a query, the results window (text and grid) supprt support the dark theme as shown below. So this is an alternate method if you don’t want to change SSMS.

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For those of you that are not developers and use SSMS for interacting with your SQL Servers and want to use a dark theme editor, you can install a bare bones instance of Visual Studio 2017 with just the database tooling by selecting the Data storage and processing workload.

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Summary

Hopefully, a future update to SSMS will enable the Dark theme out of the box and until then this is a temporary solution that may or may not work for you. For me, I spend most of my time working with SQL queries that I don’t need Output or Object Explorer visible, so I just collapse them.

This method works for both SSMS 2016 and SSMS 17.

Enjoy!

References

https://www.sqlshack.com/setting-up-the-dark-theme-in-sql-server-management-studio/

Azure

Azure Serverless: Azure Functions and Logic Apps that are ready to deploy!

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If you’re new to Azure Functions and/or Logic Apps there is a great open source library for you to browse that contains set of common use cases that are ready to deploy!

If you want to create an Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template that deploys Functions or Logic Apps, you can build your own as shown here. Just provide your GitHub repository URL and it will quickly create an azure.deploy.json file for you to include with your repos.

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Summary

These samples are available in a either C# or NodeJS and can be deployed to your Azure subscription with a click of a button. The samples cover a number of useful tasks that can easily be incorporated into your application or simply used for learning purposes. If you’re interested in contributing to this project or browsing through the code please take a look at the GitHub repository.

Enjoy!

    References

    http://functionlibrary.azurewebsites.net/

    https://github.com/jefking/FunctionLibrary

    DevelopmentEvents

    Windows Developer Day–March 7, 2018

    WindowsDeveloperDay-Mar72018

    On March 7, 2018 at 9:00 AM PST, Microsoft will livestream a Windows Developer Day event on the latest news on tools and features for developers that will be coming in the next Windows 10 Update. The livestream will cover a keynote by Kevin Gallo, CVP of the Windows Developers Platform and then be followed by a Q&A session.

    No matter what you’re working on, you’ll find plenty of improvements that will make your software even more compelling. You’ll also get inside info on:

    • Building for the modern workplace—Learn how Windows is evolving as a platform to make improving and updating your existing Windows code with new functionality as simple as possible.
    • Making your software part of the intelligent edge—Give your applications the capability to quickly make complex calculations and inferences, enabling them to become a native part of the intelligent edge.

    Windows Developer Day is the only place to find out what’s coming for developers in the next Windows 10 Update, so RSVP today.

    Enjoy!

    Resources

    Windows Developer Day

    Azure

    Try Azure Functions for Free

    In my previous post “Introduction to Azure serverless with Azure Functions, Logic Apps and Azure Event Grid” I briefly introduced each of those services from Azure. In this post I’ll show you how you can try Azure Functions for free without signing up for an Azure subscription. Let’s get started.

    Microsoft has setup a free sandbox environment for trying out Azure Functions for free. Navigate to the free trial link and select the function you want to create:

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    After clicking on the Create this function button you will be asked to choose an auth provider. Any will do and it’s just needed to get some basic information for the trial. No credit card information is required:

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    After a few seconds you should see your new HttpTrigger C# function (based on the selection from the previous screen). Click on the Run button to see your function run. From this portal you can edit your function code and save the changes, run the function and view the logs from the, test your function with different input, and see the output and status.

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    Your function also has a URL you can use to run your function outside of this portal. Go to the top right corner and click on Get function URL:

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    You will then see the get function URL modal with the key and URL. Click on the copy link and then open up another browser tab or use it within Postman:

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    Paste your function link and then add the required query string parameter Name with a value. You should then see the output of your function like so:

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    This environment is limited in what you can do. So although you can change your function code and the integrations it works with, you are prevented from managing your function app. You also only have only 59 minutes to try it out.

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    As you can see you can quickly try out Azure Functions in a sandbox environment. If and when you’re ready you can move to an Azure subscription where you can fully manage your Azure Function and get access to a world of other resources to use with your function app. It’s worth mentioning that with your Azure subscription you get access to a number of Azure resources for free within certain limits…including Azure Functions. So take a look and give Azure Functions a try.

    Enjoy!

    Resources

    Try Azure Functions for Free

    Azure Functions