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Azure Developer CLI (azd) announced: Quickly build apps for the cloud

This week Microsoft announced the public preview of the Azure Developer CLI (azd) — yes this is yet another CLI, a new open-source tool that accelerates the time it takes to get started on Azure. This post will do a quick intro of this new CLI and show how to get started and list out the resources to follow up on to learn more.

Introducing the Azure Developer CLI

You might be asking what is the Azure Developer CLI? Does this replace the Azure CLI? So let’s dive in and take a look. Think of the Azure Developer CLI as an abstraction over the Azure CLI and provides developer-friendly commands that map to key stages of your workflow: code, build, deploy, monitor, and repeat. To create, provision, and deploy a new application in one step, it’s as easy as:

azd up --template todo-nodejs-mongo

The Azure Developer CLI comes with extensible templates that include everything you need to get an application up and running in Azure. These templates include best practices, application code and reusable infrastructure as code assets written in Bicep.

The new Azure Developer CLI builds upon the experience and foundations of the Azure CLI. You can use both tools together, as needed, to support your Azure workflow.

To learn more about the Azure Developer CLI, be sure to check out the Developer Hub!

Why the need for another CLI?

As a developer, you need to make many decisions when it comes to building, deploying, and securing your application. Some of those questions you might ask are:

  • Which cloud services should I use with my code?
  • Which libraries do I need to use?
  • How should I set up my local development environment?
  • How do I provision the necessary infrastructure for my application?
  • How do I know that what I’m doing incorporates security best practices?

The Azure Developer CLI helps you answer these questions and many more. It provides you with a clear path for building your application in the cloud.

With the Azure Developer CLI, a typical developer workflow looks like this:

  1. azd init: Create an application and initialize an environment using a sample template in your preferred language.
  2. azd provision: Provision the necessary resources for your application on Azure.
  3. azd deploy: Deploy your application to Azure.
  4. azd monitor: Monitor your application’s behavior and performance and validate deployments.
  5. azd pipeline config: Create and manage CI/CD (continuous integration and continuous delivery).

Better yet, you can also use azd up to create, provision, and deploy a new application in one step! For a list of supported commands, see the Developer CLI reference docs. Alternatively, run azd –h from your preferred terminal after installation. If you no longer want or need the resources you’ve created, you can run azd down.

Whether you’re working in the terminal, your editor or IDE (like Visual Studio Code or Visual Studio), or your GitHub Actions pipeline, Azure Developer CLI commands remain consistent regardless of the context.

Getting Started

Pre-requisites

Before you get started using azd, ensure you have the following installed:

You will also need an Azure account with an active subscription. If you dont have one then you can create one for free.

Installation

With the pre-requisites installed, you can now install the standalone Azure Developer CLI via the following command in your preferred terminal.

Windows

powershell -ex AllSigned -c "Invoke-RestMethod 'https://aka.ms/install-azd.ps1' | Invoke-Expression"

macOS/Linux

curl -fsSL https://aka.ms/install-azd.sh | bash

Application templates for C#, Python, and JavaScript/TypeScript

The Azure Developer CLI uses idiomatic application templates that extend beyond “Hello World!” to include the scaffolding for monitoring and CI/CD for your application.

Each template includes application code, an /infra directory containing all the infra-as-code files needed to provision the Azure resources, and an azure.yaml file that describes your application. These templates are extensible and customizable to your specific use case.

For the first preview, they’ve authored an initial set of template applications written in Python, JavaScript/TypeScript, and C# and for hosts such as Azure App Service, Azure Container Apps, and Azure Static Web Apps + Function Apps. For more templates, check out the growing list of templates. If you’re interested in authoring your own template or creating a template from an existing application, see the Developer Hub.

In a follow up post I’ll dig deeper into one of the provided templates where we will build an application and deploy it to Azure.

Enjoy!

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Stop using ARM templates! Use the Azure CLI instead

Pascal Naber

I was a big fan of ARM templates: for many years I’m applying ARM templates on a large number of projects for all kinds of customers. I’ve written articles and blog posts about ARM templates. Have given many workshops and started collecting ARM templates used in enterprises ready for production.  I’ve written the Best practices with ARM Templates article together with my colleague Peter Groenewegen, which is the most visited blog post of Xpirit and it’s also published by Microsoft. It’s clear I was a big fan of ARM templates. But times are changing.

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Discover the Azure Architecture Center – Video Tour! – Microsoft Tech Community

The Azure Architecture Center is full of useful knowledge and resources. This Azure Tips and Tricks video gives you the tour! The Azure Architecture
— Read on techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/azure-architecture-blog/discover-the-azure-architecture-center-video-tour/ba-p/1970031

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Azure Functions in Any Language with Custom Handlers – Microsoft Tech Community

To support building serverless applications in any programming language or runtime, Azure Functions provides a Custom Handlers feature that is now
— Read on techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/apps-on-azure/azure-functions-in-any-language-with-custom-handlers/ba-p/1942744

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Callon Campbell awarded 2020-2021 Microsoft MVP in Azure

This week I received an exciting email from Microsoft that I was re-awarded for a third year now for the 2020 – 2021 Microsoft Most Valuable (MVP) award in Azure. Receiving the Microsoft MVP award is both a humbling and an exciting experience. It means you’re a member of a select group of experts of just over 2,000 MVPs from around the world, but I like to think of it as doing something I’m passionate about with other like minded individuals, having fun and always having something new to learn and share with the community.

The Microsoft MVP Award is an annual award that recognizes exceptional technology community leaders worldwide who actively share their high quality, real world expertise with users and Microsoft. All of us at Microsoft recognize and appreciate Callon’s extraordinary contributions and want to take this opportunity to share our appreciation with you.

The Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) Award Team
Microsoft Corporation

Since becoming a Microsoft MVP, I’ve learned a lot about the community and continued to share my passion, knowledge and experience within the community around Architecture and Development in Azure, DevOps and Serverless technologies. I also keep a keen eye on what’s happening on the data technologies like Cosmos DB and Azure SQL.

I was really looking forward to attending the MVP Summit back in March, but COVID-19 threw a wrench in that plan. Thankfully Microsoft moved the event online and it was still an amazing experience to connect with the product teams and MVPs from around the world – even if it was virtually.

If you’re interested in learning about the Microsoft MVP program and seeing what it takes to become a Microsoft MVP, or how to get awarded, I encourage you to take a look at the Microsoft MVP website and also the following article on “How to become a Microsoft MVP” where they explain some of the details of the program.

To wrap up this post I would like to congratulate all the other newly awarded, or renewed Microsoft MVP’s all over the world! You truly are an amazing community and I’m truly humbled and honored to be part of this group.

Enjoy!

References

Microsoft MVP Award

How to become a Microsoft MVP

Callon Campbell MVP Profile

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10 Azure DevOps Tips & Tricks that you should know

Azure DevOps has everything you need to build your software product from envisioning to put in into end-users’ hands. This post listed 10 useful …

10 Azure DevOps Tips & Tricks that you should know
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DevExpress Desktop Components | Visual Studio Toolbox

https://ift.tt/2WvXDcP In this episode, Robert is joined by Julian Bucknall, CTO of DevExpress, who shows off the power and capabilities of several …

DevExpress Desktop Components | Visual Studio Toolbox
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How to choose Azure services for working with messages in your application | Azure Friday

In this episode of Azure Friday, Azure MVP Barry “Azure Barry” Luijbregts joins Scott Hanselman to outline how you can choose the right services for working with messages and events in your application.

[0:00:48] – Presentation

Source: Channel 9

Resources

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Azure Offline Backup with Azure Data Box now in preview

Great post on doing Azure Offline Backup with Azure Data Box.

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Azure Advent Calendar – Azure Multi Factor Authentication (MFA)

Technical Blog

Salaam, Namaste, Ola and Hello! My name is Shabaz Darr and this is the 6th day of the Azure Advent Calendar ( https://azureadventcalendar.com ). One of my main focuses in my role is Security, which is why I have chosen Azure Multi Factor Authentication as my topic for this blog.

Account passwords are historically one of the easiest security measures to hack, be it via ‘Brute Force attacks’ or users have simple passwords that are easy to guess. Attacks on organizations have become more complex over the years, however basic attacks, such as email phishing, that can be done by almost anyone are still a rather effective way of gaining access to an organizations most sensitive information.Multi-factor authentication is the process of identifying users by validating two of more characteristics that are unique to that users

Multi-factor authentication has evolved as the single most effective control to insulate an organization…

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