Category: Developer

DeveloperDevOps

How I Develop Locally With GitHub and Azure DevOps Repos — El Bruno

Originally posted on The Frog Pond of Technology: A peer of mine recently asked about how I manage local code (projects, solutions, Git repos, etc.) that may or may not be synced to a cloud repository (GitHub, Azure DevOps, etc.) Since I previously blogged about How I Blog – Updated 2018 and I’m a fan…

How I Develop Locally With GitHub and Azure DevOps Repos — El Bruno
DeveloperWindows

How to install and customize the Windows Terminal

At Microsoft Build 2019 conference, Microsoft announced and showed off the new Windows Terminal application. It quickly was released as a preview and has been updated regularly over the last 12 months.

In this video, Gregor Suttie aka “Azure Greg” shows you how to install and customize the Windows Terminal. If you haven’t tried the Windows Terminal or are curious on how it can be customized then check out this video.

Enjoy!

References

https://github.com/microsoft/terminal

AzureCloudCloud NativeDeveloper

AzUrlShortener: An open source, budget-friendly URL shortener | Azure Friday

In this episode of Azure Friday, Frank Boucher joins Scott Hanselman to talk about AzUrlShortener – an open source, budget-friendly URL shortener you can deploy directly from GitHub with one click into your Azure subscription. Frank explains how to get it, why it’s inexpensive, and explores the source code.

[0:01:34] – Demo

Source: Channel 9

Resources

DeveloperDevelopmentGitHub

GitHub is now free for teams

GitHub announced that their making private repositories with unlimited collaborators available to all GitHub accounts. This means all of the core GitHub functionality is free for everyone.

For details about what features are included and compare plans, checkout the pricing page at https://github.com/pricing

Enjoy!

Resources

https://github.blog/2020-04-14-github-is-now-free-for-teams/

AzureDeveloperDevOps

Publish Nuget packages in Azure DevOps Pipelines

If you’re using Azure DevOps for your build, did you know you can also publish your NuGet packages?

Here is a great post that walks you through the process.

Enjoy!

In Azure DevOps, Pipelines can be used to build your solution, create a Nuget package and publish the Nuget package to the Nuget feed for further …

Publish Nuget packages in Azure DevOps Pipelines

AzureDeveloperDevOps

Moving an Azure DevOps repo to use Github Actions instead

In this blog post, I am going to take an existing web application that resides in Azure DevOps and port it to build and deploy within GitHub and use …

Moving an Azure DevOps repo to use Github Actions instead
DeveloperDevelopment

New GitHub CLI announced and available as beta

This week GitHub announced the beta for their new GitHub CLI tool, which provides an easier and more seamless way for you to interact with GitHub from your terminal.

The GitHub CLI can be installed on Windows, macOS and Linux. Get started by downloading the installer from the GitHub CLI repository.

New GitHub CLI announced and available as beta

What can GitHub CLI do?

Once you have it downloaded, open up your terminal and use the gh command:

The GitHub CLI beta currently allows you to do the following commands:

  • Pull requests: Using the pr command to checkout, create, list, status and view
  • Issues: Using the issue command to create, list, status and view
  • Help: Using help command to see how to use the tool

When you first use it you will need to authenticate the GitHub CLI. As you can see here I will be prompted to open GitHub in my browser:

After authenticating the GitHub CLI you will be able to continue with your last command:

I needed to change directories to where my repository was and then I was able to list out my pull requests using the following command:

gh pr list

For more details about what can be done, check out the GitHub CLI manual for lots of examples on using each of the commands.

Wrap up

This is an early look at what can be done with the GitHub CLI, and because it’s still in early development the team would love for you to give the tool a try and then provide them feedback.

Enjoy!

Resources

Announcement https://github.blog/2020-02-12-supercharge-your-command-line-experience-github-cli-is-now-in-beta/

Download from https://cli.github.com/

Documentation at https://cli.github.com/manual/

AzureDeveloperLearning

Want to learn Azure? 10 tips for learning Azure in the new year

Learning Azure in 2020

As things start to wind down for the end of the year and we take a break from work to be with family and friends, you might start to think about resolutions for 2020. If one of your resolutions is to learn Azure then now is the best time to do so.

Here are some community resources to help you get started:

  1. Create a free Azure account: You can sign up with a Microsoft or GitHub account and get access to 12 months of popular free services, a 30-day Azure free trial with $200 to spend during that period and over 25 services that are free forever.
  2. Stay current with the Azure Application Developer and Languages page: This is a single, unified destination for developers and architects that covers Azure application development. The content is updated monthly.
  3. Free Developer’s Guide to Azure eBook: a free eBook that includes all the updates from Microsoft’s first-party conferences (Build, Ignite), along with new services and features announced since then.
  4. Learn Azure in a Month of Lunches, a free e-book to build your cloud computing skills quickly and efficiently.
  5. Azure Tips and Tricks :Azure Tips and Tricks helps developers learn something new within a couple of minutes.
  6. Azure.Source Newsletter where you can catch up on Azure in one post
  7. Microsoft.Source Newsletter where you can get the latest articles, documentation, and events from the developer community
  8. Azure weekly, a great way to keep up to date with what’s new each and every week
  9. Microsoft Learn – Azure fundamentals course. If you’re interested in the cloud, but aren’t quite sure what it can do for you? This path is the place to start.
  10. Azure documentation is the most comprehensive and current resource you’ll find for all of our Azure services.

Enjoy and happy learning for 2020!

AzureDeveloperDevelopment

25 days of serverless

Azure Advocates’ 25 Days of Serverless

December 1st sparks the start of Microsoft’s 25 days of serverless challanges. Each day throughout the month of December a new challenge will be published from the Microsoft Cloud Advocates. Your goal is to solve it in the programming language of your choice and then submit your solution via GitHub.

If you don’t know anything about Azure or serverless then no problem. Each challenge will provide hints to get your started

The Premise

Oh no! An evil grinch has stolen all of the world’s servers! Travel around the world helping everyone replace their current solutions to common tasks with serverless technology in time for the holiday rush.

Each day’s puzzle will bring you to a new location somewhere in the world! You’ll be helping local folks in that location with some problem they have, showing how moving to serverless can help things get done! Each day’s puzzle will bring you to a new location somewhere in the world! You’ll be helping local folks in that location with some problem they have, showing how moving to serverless can help things get done!

Join the Microsoft @AzureAdvocates and puzzle solvers all over the world for #25DaysOfServerless adventures!

Enjoy!

References

https://25daysofserverless.com/

https://dev.to/azure/merry-and-bright-with-azure-advocates-25-days-of-serverless-1hi0

DeveloperWindows

Adding the Visual Studio Developer Command Prompt to Windows Terminal

The Windows Terminal was announced at Build 2019 and is open source and free. In this article I’ll show you how to add a new shell profile for the Developer Command Prompt for VS2019.

Getting Windows Terminal

Windows Terminal requires Windows 10 1903. You can get the Windows Terminal for free from the Store. For users who are unable to download from the Store, Windows Terminal builds can manually be downloaded from the repositories Release page.

JSON Syntax

The Windows Terminal settings is stored in a “Profiles.json” file. You can access this file from the Settings menu located in the dropdown menu to the right of the add new shell button as shown below.

Alternatively this file is located in the following path:

%USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\LocalState

Editing the Profiles.json file is easy, but if your unfamiliar with the JSON syntax then there are few things you need to know.

  1. Do not use backslash (\) in file paths. These should be replaced with a forward slash (/).
  2. Always close files paths in double quotes.
  3. All lines must end in a comma except for the last line in a section or block.

Adding the Develper Command Prompt Profile

This section assumes that you have Visual Studio 2019 installed and have access to the Developer Command Prompt for VS 2019.

{
    "acrylicOpacity": 0.75,
    "closeOnExit": true,
    "colorScheme": "Campbell",
    "commandline": "cmd.exe /k \"C://Program Files (x86)//Microsoft Visual Studio//2019//Enterprise//Common7//Tools//VsDevCmd.bat\"",
    "cursorColor": "#FFFFFF",
    "cursorShape": "bar",
    "fontFace": "Consolas",
    "fontSize": 10,
    "guid": "{26b30263-74e9-4146-b80e-11632e86d42c}",
    "historySize": 9001,
    "icon": "ms-appdata:///roaming/vs2019-32.png",
    "name": "Developer Command Prompt for VS2019",
    "padding": "0, 0, 0, 0",
    "snapOnInput": true,
    "startingDirectory": "%USERPROFILE%",
    "useAcrylic": true
},

A couple things to note about the above profile that you might need to change based on your local system.

  1. For the “commandline” line, you will want to change “Enterprise” to the Visual Studio 2019 SKU you have, like “Professional” or “Community”.
  2. For the “icon” line, I downloaded a VS 2019 icon from https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/ and resized it to 32×32 and saved it in my RoamingState folder %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\RoamingState
  3. For the “guid” line, you need to generate a new GUID and enter it in here.

Once you’ve saved these changes restart the Windows Terminal app and your new Developer Command Prompt for VS 2019 will be listed.

There are a number of other consoles you can add like “Python”, “Linux Bash”, “PowerShell Core, “Ubuntu”, and many more.

Enjoy!

References

Windows Terminal on GitHub

Download Windows Terminal from the Store

Windows Terminal Documentation

A new Console for Windows – It’s the open source Windows Terminal