Category: Developer

AzureDeveloperDevelopment

25 days of serverless

Azure Advocates’ 25 Days of Serverless

December 1st sparks the start of Microsoft’s 25 days of serverless challanges. Each day throughout the month of December a new challenge will be published from the Microsoft Cloud Advocates. Your goal is to solve it in the programming language of your choice and then submit your solution via GitHub.

If you don’t know anything about Azure or serverless then no problem. Each challenge will provide hints to get your started

The Premise

Oh no! An evil grinch has stolen all of the world’s servers! Travel around the world helping everyone replace their current solutions to common tasks with serverless technology in time for the holiday rush.

Each day’s puzzle will bring you to a new location somewhere in the world! You’ll be helping local folks in that location with some problem they have, showing how moving to serverless can help things get done! Each day’s puzzle will bring you to a new location somewhere in the world! You’ll be helping local folks in that location with some problem they have, showing how moving to serverless can help things get done!

Join the Microsoft @AzureAdvocates and puzzle solvers all over the world for #25DaysOfServerless adventures!

Enjoy!

References

https://25daysofserverless.com/

https://dev.to/azure/merry-and-bright-with-azure-advocates-25-days-of-serverless-1hi0

DeveloperWindows

Adding the Visual Studio Developer Command Prompt to Windows Terminal

The Windows Terminal was announced at Build 2019 and is open source and free. In this article I’ll show you how to add a new shell profile for the Developer Command Prompt for VS2019.

Getting Windows Terminal

Windows Terminal requires Windows 10 1903. You can get the Windows Terminal for free from the Store. For users who are unable to download from the Store, Windows Terminal builds can manually be downloaded from the repositories Release page.

JSON Syntax

The Windows Terminal settings is stored in a “Profiles.json” file. You can access this file from the Settings menu located in the dropdown menu to the right of the add new shell button as shown below.

Alternatively this file is located in the following path:

%USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\LocalState

Editing the Profiles.json file is easy, but if your unfamiliar with the JSON syntax then there are few things you need to know.

  1. Do not use backslash (\) in file paths. These should be replaced with a forward slash (/).
  2. Always close files paths in double quotes.
  3. All lines must end in a comma except for the last line in a section or block.

Adding the Develper Command Prompt Profile

This section assumes that you have Visual Studio 2019 installed and have access to the Developer Command Prompt for VS 2019.

{
    "acrylicOpacity": 0.75,
    "closeOnExit": true,
    "colorScheme": "Campbell",
    "commandline": "cmd.exe /k \"C://Program Files (x86)//Microsoft Visual Studio//2019//Enterprise//Common7//Tools//VsDevCmd.bat\"",
    "cursorColor": "#FFFFFF",
    "cursorShape": "bar",
    "fontFace": "Consolas",
    "fontSize": 10,
    "guid": "{26b30263-74e9-4146-b80e-11632e86d42c}",
    "historySize": 9001,
    "icon": "ms-appdata:///roaming/vs2019-32.png",
    "name": "Developer Command Prompt for VS2019",
    "padding": "0, 0, 0, 0",
    "snapOnInput": true,
    "startingDirectory": "%USERPROFILE%",
    "useAcrylic": true
},

A couple things to note about the above profile that you might need to change based on your local system.

  1. For the “commandline” line, you will want to change “Enterprise” to the Visual Studio 2019 SKU you have, like “Professional” or “Community”.
  2. For the “icon” line, I downloaded a VS 2019 icon from https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/ and resized it to 32×32 and saved it in my RoamingState folder %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\RoamingState
  3. For the “guid” line, you need to generate a new GUID and enter it in here.

Once you’ve saved these changes restart the Windows Terminal app and your new Developer Command Prompt for VS 2019 will be listed.

There are a number of other consoles you can add like “Python”, “Linux Bash”, “PowerShell Core, “Ubuntu”, and many more.

Enjoy!

References

Windows Terminal on GitHub

Download Windows Terminal from the Store

Windows Terminal Documentation

A new Console for Windows – It’s the open source Windows Terminal

DesignDeveloperDevelopmentManagementSoftware

Chernobyl: The True Cost Of Technical Debt

link.medium.com/6CMGCxeA6X

Build 2019DeveloperWindows

Build 2019: Announcing the new Windows Terminal

During Rajesh Jha’s keynote, Kevin Gallo announced the new Windows Terminal and showed the following “sizzle video” that showcases that the team wants to aspire for v1.0: 

Windows Terminal Session

Rich Turner (Senior Program Manager) and Michael Niksa (Senior Software Engineer) delivered a deep-dive session into the Windows Terminal, its architecture, and its code.

What’s new with the Windows Command Line

See Scott Hanselman interview the Windows Terminal team and discuss several aspects of the new Terminal capabilities, the process of opening sourcing Terminal and looking at some of its features:

The new Windows Terminal will run alongside Console and will not replace it. They are looking to target a preview download from the Microsoft Store by Summer 2019, and to deliver v1.0 release by end of 2019.

You can go try it now if you like by cloning the repository. This is pretty exciting and I can’t wait to download, compile and give it a try.

Enjoy!

References

DatabaseDeveloper

SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) 18.0 now Generally Available

SQL Server Management Studio v18.0 is now generally available and is the latest version that provides support for almost all feature areas on SQL Server 2008 through to 2019 preview.

If you have a preview of SSMS 18.0 installed, you will need to uninstall before you can install SSMS 18.0 GA. SSMS 18.0 will also not replace an older version of SSMS but will run side by side with it.

image

Release Highlights

Here is a brief list of is new in SSMS 18.0.

  • Support for SQL Server 2019. SSMS 18.0 is the first release to be fully aware of SQL Server 2019 (compatLevel 150).
  • SSMS 18.0 is based off the Visual Studio 2017 Isolated Shell.
  • Smaller download size.
  • Accessibility improvements.
  • Ability to install to a custom folder.
  • Requires .NET Framework 4.7.2 or greater.
  • Support for High DPI (by default).
  • Added integration for Azure Data Studio.
  • Still no official support for Dark Mode. Please see my article on how to enable Dark Mode for SSMS.
  • Database Diagrams has been removed. Seriously it’s gone! You will need to install a previous version of SSMS (like 17.8.1) to get this functionality.

Summary

Dark mode is still not available and remains a feature you have to manually enable. It’s also weird that they dropped support for the Database Diagramming tool without any warning or guidance to replace it. This was a gem of a tool inside of SSMS and was simple to use for visualizing database relationships, and documentation. You will need to rely on an older version of SSMS or use another tool. Other than that it looks like a great update to SSMS.

For more details on what’s new, bug fixes and deprecations, please take a look at the detailed release notes.

To get started download SSMS 18.0 (GA) now.

Enjoy!

References