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Microsoft Redefines Leadership in Top 100 Global Technology Leader list by Thomson Reuters — Build Azure

Thomson Reuters has released their first Top 100 Global Technology Leaders list to define new criteria for determining leadership in the 21st century. They’ve already been tracking tons of metrics on companies all around the world for their clients, and have decided to combine it all to create this new list. Thomson Reuters feels they’ve…

via Microsoft Redefines Leadership in Top 100 Global Technology Leader list by Thomson Reuters — Build Azure

 

Productivity

You can now install Office 365 desktop apps from the Microsoft Store

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Office 365 is now available for purchase and installation from the Microsoft Store. It was first available only for Windows 10 S but has now expanded to support Windows 10.

If you want to install from the Microsoft Store, you first need to uninstall your current installation.

Once Office 365 is installed from the Microsoft Store it will automatically be updated like the rest of the store apps.

From the looks of it you can install the following:

  • Office 365 Personal
  • Office 365 Home

I currently install Office 365 Home from https://Office.com but I’m going to try this option out.

Enjoy!

Azure

How to return JSON from an Azure Function

In this post I’m going to answer a question someone asked me recently when I presented an Introduction to Azure Functions – can we return JSON from the HttpTrigger function? The answer is yes and it’s not limited to the Http trigger function and I’ll walk you through one of many ways to do this.

First let’s start off by taking a look at the output that shows up by default from the HttpTrigger Function I had created in the Azure portal. As you can see the default output is XML as shown here:

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The same goes for the response when the require “name” parameter is missing in the query string or the body of the request:

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You might think that there is a simple property in the Azure Function properties to configure the output, but there isn’t, at least at this point in time with version 1 runtime.

Creating a C# Http Trigger Function

Let’s quickly create an Azure Function in the portal and I can show you one of many ways to return JSON from your Azure Function.

1. Create a new Serverless Function App:

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2. Once your Azure Function app is running, create a new C# Http trigger function and then provide it a name and authentication model:

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3. Now that your function is created you will see the following code in the run.csx file. If you run it you will get XML as your response, so let’s go ahead and update this function to return JSON.

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Changing the return type to JSON

For this example I’ll import Newtonsoft.Json package and then serialize a simple object to return back when the function is called.

1. Add Newtonsoft.Json package and other using references:

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2. Update function code to use Newtonsoft.Json. Looking at the following code you will see that I’ve created a simple POCO object which is what I’ll be returning from the function. I then changed the response to return a serialized string in UTF8 encoding and application/response:

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3. Now when we run the function through either the browser or Postman we’ll see the response in JSON format. Here is what we would see in Postman:

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and then in a browser we would see this:

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Azure Functions is a powerful component in Azure serverless offering and as you can see your not limited to XML as the only response format.

Let me know if you have any questions and I’d be happy to investigate and follow up.

Enjoy!

Uncategorized

Downloading Microsoft Docs as PDF

Did you know you can download a specific set of docs as a PDF without it taking gigabytes of space, enabling you to take it anywhere with you on your desktop or mobile device.

Simply go to the particular docs you’re interested in, for example the Azure Application Architecture Guide and then below table of contents on the left side you will see a Download PDF button.

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Clicking the Download PDF button will open up the latest version of the docs for this topic in a browser and from here you can click to save.

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As you can see it downloaded a 73 page PDF document with all the content found online.

As content is changed online, clicking the Download PDF will result in getting the latest version of this document.

To follow up and learn about other updates to the Microsoft Docs site, follow their blog at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/teamblog/.

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Enjoy!

References

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/teamblog/docs-november-update

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/teamblog/

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-ca/azure/

Azure

Microsoft Azure Roadmap and Updates

Azure has three areas online where you can go to keep up to date with Azure updates and what the roadmap is for certain products within Azure.

Microsoft Cloud Platform Roadmap

The Microsoft Cloud Platform Roadmap provides a snapshot of what Microsoft is working on in their cloud platform business. From here you can use the roadmap to find out what they’re recently made generally available, released to public preview, are still developing and testing, or what’s no longer being developed. You can search by Product Category and/or Status.

For Product Category you have the following categories:

  • Application development
  • Cloud infrastructure
  • Data management and analytics
  • Enterprise Mobility + Security
  • Internet of Things

For Status type you can search by the following types:

  • All
  • In Development
  • In Preview
  • Now Available

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For each result there is a date of when it was last updated and then a status of either In Development, In Preview, and Now Available.

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Finally you can can click the Learn more link for further details about this update.

Azure Roadmap

The Azure Roadmap page shows you where they’re heading and any upcoming changes to Azure products. This is the place to find out what’s new

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Azure Updates

The Azure Updates page allows you to see all the updates in one place. You can filter by product, update type and even platform.

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Enjoy!

References

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/roadmap/

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloud-platform/roadmap/

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Serverless On-Demand Scaling : Pushing the pedal when you need it…

Karim Vaes

Introduction

A lot of workloads are driven by peak consumption. From my experience, there aren’t the amount of workloads that have a constant performance need are in the minority. Now here comes the interesting opportunity when leveraging serverless architectures… Here you only pay for your actual consumption. So if you tweak your architecture to leverage this, then you can get huge gains!

For today’s post, I’ll be using VMchooser once again as an example. A lot has changed since the last post on the anatomy of this application. Here is an updated drawing of the high level architecture ;

Underneath you can see the flow that’ll be used when doing a “Bulk Mapping” (aka “CSV Upload”). The webapp (“frontend”) will store the CSV as a blob on the storage account. Once a new blob arrives, a function will be triggered that will examine the CSV file and put every entry…

View original post 953 more words

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How to Configure Git in Visual Studio to Prune Branches during a Fetch

If you’ve been using Git from within Visual Studio 2017 you might be aware of the fact that when performing a fetch it would not automatically prune your local list of branches that no longer exist on the server. Typically you would have to open up a Command Prompt and run the following command to cleanup your list of branches that exist on the remote:

> git remote prune origin

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Well now with Visual Studio 2017 Update 5 you can now configure your global and repository settings to prune your local list of branches on every fetch. Let’s take a look at how you can configure this.

First download and install Visual Studio 2017 Update 5. You can do this from within Visual Studio under the Tools menu:

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Once you have Visual Studio 2017 Update 5 installed, go to the Team Explorer pane and click on Settings where you can configure your default behavior for your Global and/or Repository Settings:

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Now you can change the setting to prune remote branches on every fetch. In my opinion this should be the default value.

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Another nice addition to the Git settings in Visual Studio 2017 Update 5 is the ability to Rebase your changes when you pull. I’ll explore that in a future post.

In summary when enabling the prune on every fetch, this means your local list of branches is always up-to-date with the remote. Pruning will cleanup and remove your local tracking branches that no longer exist on the server.

Enjoy!

References

Git Configuration: Configure your default behavior