Category: Uncategorized

Uncategorized

Intro to Azure for Developers FREE Webinar On-Demand from Opsgility

Build5Nines

The other day I hosted a FREE Webinar with Opsgility that provides an Introduction to Azure for Developers. In this webinar I went over an introduction to what IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS are. Then I dove into the Azure Portal and showed how to create IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) VMs with Windows and Linux, as well as how to remote into those VMs with Remote Desktop and SSH; respectively. I also went into deploying a Web Application into an Azure Web App PaaS (Platform as a Service) service directly from within the Visual Studio IDE, and I even showed how you can easily deploy a website directly from Github into an Azure Web App as well! I also discussed Azure SQL Database (“Database as a Service”), as well as a few additional services and features.

I encourage you to watch the entire webinar recording to see the whole demo…

View original post 25 more words

Uncategorized

Top 10 Tricks to Save Money with Azure Virtual Machines

Build5Nines

This post contains 10 tips and tricks you can use to save money on your Virtual Machines (VMs) running in the Microsoft Azure cloud. The cost analysis of the cloud can be scary at first, and it’s actually one of the reasons companies are shy to start adopting the cloud. Once you know these tricks you’ll feel confident that you won’t overspend and go broke in Microsoft Azure.

Some of these tips are almost secrets, as they aren’t really talked about anywhere. I know these from my years of experience working with Microsoft Azure and getting to know many of the ins and outs of the platform. So, read below, and benefit from my years of Azure experience in just a few minutes.

Using these tips will certainly help you save your company or organization money, and will likely impress your boss!

View original post 1,814 more words

Uncategorized

Azure Functions Visual Studio Tools Preview

Build5Nines

functions_colorThe serverless computing realm of cloud computing has been growing in interest and functionality lately. Recently, Azure Functions reached General Availability and an eagerly anticipated v1.0 release. Microsoft has not stopped there, in fact they just recently released a Preview of the new Visual Studio Tools for Azure Functions. These tools bring Azure Functions support into the Visual Studio IDE!

Visual Studio Tools for Azure Functions Preview

The new Visual Studio Tools for Azure Functions is currently in a Preview release state. As a result, the tools aren’t fully complete yet, and as with any Preview release it can be expected that things may / will change a bit before the final release. All preview releases can be expected to have some rough spots, bugs, and limitations. That being stated…

The requirements to install the Visual Studio Tools for Azure Functions are:

  • You must be running Visual Studio 2015…

View original post 993 more words

Uncategorized

Visual Studio 2017 Development using a VM in Azure

Build5Nines

screen-shot-2017-03-04-at-10-43-14-amIn the past the only option for writing code and building software using Visual Studio was to install it on your local machine. With technologies like Windows Hyper-V and VMWare things became less invasive by allowing you to develop software inside of a Virtual Machine (VM). With the cloud, things have become even easier. You can now easily, spin up a Virtual Machine in Microsoft Azure, use it for what ever you need, then shut it down or delete it when it’s no longer needed. This can be an extremely valuable tool for any software developer; especially when you might need multiple development environment configurations on a regular basis. This article helps you navigate the benefits as well as the process of utilizing Microsoft Azure to host multiple development machines running Visual Studio 2017 in the cloud.

A newer version of this article exists for setting up a Visual Studio…

View original post 3,827 more words

Uncategorized

Azure Functions vs Web Jobs: How to choose?

Build5Nines

There are a few choices when it comes to implementing custom background processing tasks. The main options in the Microsoft Azure cloud are to use either Azure Functions or Azure Web Jobs. Functions are newer, cooler, and may seem to be the obvious choice going forward, however, the choice isn’t really that easy. This article outlines the points you need to consider when deciding between Azure Functions or Azure Web Jobs.

Azure Functions are Web Jobs

Before we get into the specifics of when Azure Functions are appropriate, or when Azure Web Jobs are appropriate, it’s best to mention that Azure Functions are built on top of the Azure Web Jobs foundation. So, essentially, Azure Functions are Web Jobs. You could almost say that between the two, it’s Web Jobs all the way down.

With Azure App Service and Web Apps, Microsoft implemented Azure Web Jobs as a means to…

View original post 1,285 more words

Uncategorized

Fixing Azure Portal Errors

Build5Nines

All software has errors. The Microsoft Azure Portal is no different. When this happens you’ll receive one of two different alerts of the error; either an error message or a rain cloud. It’s easy to have a “table flip” moment when this occurs and start grumbling how “the cloud is horrible” or “why Azure sucks”, but there’s generally an explanation for these errors and they normally don’t last long. This post explains a bit of why these errors occur, when they’re more likely, and how to fix / workaround them.

View original post 827 more words

Uncategorized

How big is the Microsoft Azure Cloud?

Build5Nines

The Microsoft Azure Cloud is huge. Or should I say H-y-uuuuu-ge! It’s the largest cloud provider in the world with 38 Regions currently (30 online) spread across the globe, and Microsoft keeps adding more regions every few months. Microsoft has been betting the future of their Enterprise business on Azure since the initial General Availability in 2010, and they’ve increased their efforts over the last couple of years as the “Cloud Wars” have been speeding up.

Microsoft has been a little vague over the years. They publish how many Azure Regions there are, and what cities they’re located in. I’ve put together a map that plots the city location of each of the Azure Regions to help visualize things on the Region side of the equation. However, they don’t disclose the street addresses of the data centers, and until recently they haven’t exactly stated how many data centers make up the 38…

View original post 271 more words

Uncategorized

CloudDays™ – Quick Start to Azure Redis Cache

DevDays®

redisAzure Redis Cache helps your application become more responsive even as user load increases and leverages the low latency, high-throughput capabilities of the Redis engine. This separate distributed cache layer allows your data tier to scale independently for more efficient use of compute resources in your application layer.

Redis is an open source, BSD licensed, advanced key-value cache and store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists, sets, sorted sets, bitmaps and hyperloglogs. Redis supports a set of atomic operations on these data types.

Microsoft Azure Redis Cache is based on this cache and store. It gives you access to a secure, dedicated Redis cache, managed by Microsoft, providing the best of both worlds: the rich features and ecosystem of Redis, and reliable hosting and monitoring by Microsoft.

You can use Redis from

View original post 1,700 more words

Uncategorized

CloudDays™ – Choosing the Right Azure Cache Technology

DevDays®

azurecloudMicrosoft Azure Cache is a family of distributed, in-memory, scalable solutions that enable you to build highly scalable and responsive applications by providing super-fast access to your data. But what do you choose?

This post provides you with an overview of the options you have when you are considering caching technologies.

Microsoft Azure Cache is available in the following offerings.

Microsoft offers a strong recommended choice for these caches. “Microsoft recommends all new developments use Azure Redis Cache.”

That said, this post discusses each to give you a quick overview. This article also introduces you to one other cache.

Here’s the short answer:

  • Use Azure Redis Cache when you want to cache string, hashes, .NET classes, data.
  • Use CDN when you want to cache audio, video, applications, images, and other files.

View original post 592 more words